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3 edition of Short- and long-term health effects on the surviving population of a nuclear war found in the catalog.

Short- and long-term health effects on the surviving population of a nuclear war

United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research.

Short- and long-term health effects on the surviving population of a nuclear war

hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, on to examining some of the consequences that could affect the surviving population of a nuclear war, June 19, 1980

by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research.

  • 260 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Atomic bomb -- Blast effect,
  • Atomic bomb -- Physiological effect,
  • Nuclear warfare -- Social aspects

  • The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 133 p. ;
    Number of Pages133
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14215525M

      A planned conference to discuss the threat of nuclear attack will be rescheduled so public health officials can focus on the immediate threat of the flu, the Centers for Disease Control and. The effects of the nuclear war could precipitate additional catastrophes, such as a pandemic (due to weakened public health infrastructure) or a catastrophic failure of geoengineering (leading to.

      "The Internet was literally designed to be a network robust enough to survive a nuclear war," he added. "It is holding up exactly as designed during the additional load caused by people working.   Here’s what he found: The most devastating long-term effects of a nuclear war actually come down to the black smoke, along with the dust and particulates in the air, that attacks produce.

    War or terrorism; and Poverty, discrimination, and historic al trauma.3 Trauma overwhelms a person’s coping capacity and has long-term effects on functioning and well-being.4 Normal, protective responses to threats (“fight, flight, or freeze”) are activated by the perception of a threat. A person who has experienced trauma mayFile Size: KB. Long-term Radiation-Related Health Effects in a Unique Human Population: Lessons Learned from the Atomic Bomb Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness. Volume 5. Supplement 1.


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Short- and long-term health effects on the surviving population of a nuclear war by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Short- and long-term health effects on the surviving population of a nuclear war: hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, on to examining some of the consequences that could affect the surviving population of a nuclear war, J Short- and long-term health effects on the surviving population of a nuclear war: hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, on to [sic] examining some of the consequences that could affect the surviving population of a nuclear war, J   At almost exactly the same moment, a Stanford University physicist, science writer, and book publisher named Michael Riordan was readying another book about the effects of nuclear war Author: Alexis C.

Madrigal. Now the official flower of Hiroshima, the oleander offers a beautiful symbol for the city as a whole; while some feared that the city and its population were irreparably destroyed—permanently cut off from normality by the effects of radiation—many would be surprised to learn of the limited long term health effects the nuclear attacks on.

An important turning point in the history of studies of health effects at ABCC was the formulation of a unified study program by the Francis Committee in 6 The unified study program instituted continuing epidemiological follow-up for mortality and cancer incidence of a fixed sample of about A-bomb survivors and control subjects Cited by:   Long-term Radiation-Related Health Effects in a Unique Human Population: Lessons Learned from the Atomic Bomb Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki - Volume 5 Issue S1 - Evan B.

Douple, Kiyohiko Mabuchi, Harry M. Cullings, Dale L. Preston, Kazunori Kodama, Yukiko Shimizu, Saeko Fujiwara, Roy E. ShoreCited by: Capable of surviving 10 sieverts of radiation, humans would not be able to survive a nuclear war. The levels of radiation emitted by modern nuclear bombs are well above the sieverts released.

The Effects of Nuclear War by United States Congress (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating. ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book 5/5(1).

Long-term Radiation-Related Health Effects in a Unique Human Population: Lessons Learned from the Atomic Bomb Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Volume 5, Issue S1 Evan B. Douple, Kiyohiko Mabuchi, Harry M. Cullings, Dale L. Preston, Kazunori Kodama, Yukiko Shimizu, Cited by: Nuclear War Survival Skills or NWSS, by Cresson Kearny, is a civil defense manual.

It contains information gleaned from research performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the Cold War, as well as from Kearny's extensive jungle living and international travels.

Nuclear War Survival Skills aims to provide a general audience with advice on how to survive conditions likely to be Author: Cresson H. Kearny. In his book Reasons and Persons, philosopher Derek Parfit posed the following question. Compare three outcomes: Peace. A nuclear war that kills 99% of the world’s existing population.

A nuclear war that kills %. (2) would be worse than (1), and (3) would be worse than (2). Herbert L. Abrams, M.D. Stanford University, Stanford, California. Any analysis of our capacity to survive a nuclear war must view the medical problems that survivors will confront 1 in the context of the health care system's capacity to provide a meaningful response.

A system has been defined as a group of diverse units combined to form an integral whole and to function in unison, usually Author: Fred Solomon, Robert Q.

Marston. examine the effects of a limited nuclear war. The report and testimony of that panel, which were published by the Senate Foreign Relations Commit-tee, remain valid. That panel recommended that a more thorough and com-prehensive study of the effects of nuclear war Cited by: The energy of a nuclear explosion is released in the form of a blast wave, thermal radiation (heat) and nuclear radiation.

The distribution of energy in these three forms depends on the yield of the weapon. For nuclear weapons in the kiloton range, the energy is divided in various forms, roughly as 50% blast, 35% thermal and 15% nuclear radiation.5/5(1).

Health Effects from Radiation. People who survive the physical shockwave and heat may suffer health effects from radiation.

The health effects of radiation depend on the: • Amount of radiation absorbed by the body (the dose, measured in unit called rads), • Type of radiation, • Route of exposure (absorbed by the body, inhaled, or ingested.

Late-onset effects of exposure to ionising radiation on the human body have been identified by long-term, large-scale epidemiological studies. The cohort study of Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (the Life Span Study) is thought to be the most reliable source of information about these health effects because of the size of the cohort, the exposure of a Cited by:   Managing Crises in the Short and Long Term.

McNulty is a coauthor of the book You’re It: One thing about this crisis is that it’s both an economic and a health crisis. It effects people. The health effects of nuclear explosions are due primarily to air blast, thermal radiation, initial nuclear radiation, and residual nuclear radiation or fallout.

Blast. Nuclear explosions produce air-blast effects similar to those produced by conventional explosives. $\begingroup$ Surviving the immediate effects and long term survival are two very different things. A fallout shelter plus being away from the bombs is enough to give you survival in the short term.

A fallout shelter plus being away from the bombs is enough to give you survival in the short term. These are just some of the effects the detonation of a nuclear device would have on the human population of a region. It should also be noted that the plant and animal life of.

Inside the U.S. government’s plans to survive a nuclear war Raven Rock, a hollowed out mountain near the Maryland-Pennsylvania border. type of immediate and long-term health consequences that can be expected in the event of even a limited use of nuclear weapons.

The following describes the health effects and casualties that could be expected from only one 10 to 20 kiloton nuclear weapon (the size of. How to Survive a Nuclear Attack.

The Cold War ended over two decades ago, and many people have never lived under the shadow of nuclear and radiological threats. Still, a nuclear attack is a very real threat. Global politics are far from 88%().